Alexandra von Furstenberg’s Plexiglass Furniture

AVF-Acrylic-Gem-Box-Trio-6x4

One can see Ms von Furstenberg’s resume in her work, her design influence from Parsons School of Design and Brown University, and her love of fashion and trend from her Creative Director and Director of Image days at ex mother in law’s company, DVF. Alex was integral in the relaunch of the wrap dress in the 90’s, this training led to her business acumen, intuition and skills all necessary in creating her own business.

 

The first collection of furniture was called “Fearless”. 8 all neon pieces… desks, dining, cocktail and end tables, named after her love of the facets of diamonds eg “Brilliant” and “Trillion”. It was part art, part fashion, part retro, part future, all working together in sync.

The second collection she knew ” had to be black and smokey”, thus the 9 piece “Voltage” was created, bringing in a more traditional and sultry take on modern. Accessories logically followed, the “Accents” line consists of colorful bowls, vases, trays, all functional, highly decorative and charged with energy. Alexandra has clearly shown here, that style transcends fashion, if one is born with it, it will show up in every aspect of your life. Just getting started with furniture, she is gearing up to expand into lifestyle, which I’m sure will carry out the theme of high voltage energy ensconced in an elegant modernism. Her very cool store, on upper Melrose, in Los Angeles, is case in point.

www.alexandravonfurstenberg.com

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In 2007, Alexandra von Furstenberg launched her innovative and successful furniture and accessories company, AVF, after creating a few personal pieces which then became highly coveted and in demand by friends and peers. Her love of acrylic, plexiglass, lucite in fluorescent and neon colors, takes a brilliant idea, like Philippe Starck’s Ghost Chair, 10 steps further into an intrepid design abyss. By utilizing geometric and prism shapes, and right proportions, her pieces can anchor any room, from a 19th century Parisian apartment, to a LES loft. Although they are modern, even futuristic, they are versatile and work well with different aesthetics.

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